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Day of Atonement ~ Yom Kippur

 

This day was in a sense, the most sacred of the year for Israel as it was the day when the High Priest entered the Most Holy Place; it happened once a year (Leviticus 16 & Numbers 29:7-11).

He entered first to make atonement for his own sin, by blood sacrifice and then another blood sacrifice for the sins of the nation of Israel. ‘Without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sin’ Hebrews 9:22 & (Leviticus 17:11).

This feast was actually a day of afflicting one’s soul, humiliation and a day of no work (Leviticus 16:29-31); all of which are fulfilled in Christ, who has forgiven us when we confess our sins and is our Sabbath Rest.

 

Jesus is our ‘Great High Priest’, ‘our mediator’, and He is also the spotless ‘Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world’ (Hebrew 9:11 & 1 Timothy 2:5 & John 1:29).

Jesus, as the High Priesthood of Melchizedek forever; once and for all, made atonement for mankind, unlike the priest from Aaron’s lineage who had to come once a year, every year to sacrifice by the blood of animals, and lay sin on the goat outside the gate.  The purpose of this feast was to cleanse the people from their sin and to purify the Holy Place.  Jesus is the most holy place [The Temple], and complete atonement for sin, satisfying and fulfilling the shadow of the Law. [Colossians 2:16-18; Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 10:1]

Romans 3:24-26, speaks of Christ’s redemption by His blood and Hebrews 9:7, 10:3, 19-22 speaks of Jesus as the mediator and that we can enter the Holy of Holies by the blood of Jesus.

 

The following corresponding verses from the Mosaic Law compared with the NT, show exactly how this feast was fulfilled in Christ, fully and completely.

 

[Leviticus 16 corresponds with Leviticus 23:27-32]

Lev 16:3 Thus shall Aaron [the High Priest] come into the holy place: with a young bullock for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering.

 

Heb 9:11,12 But Christ being come an high priest… Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us.

 

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Lev 16:12,13    And he shall take a censer full of burning coals…and bring it within the veil: And he shall put the incense upon the fire before the LORD, that the cloud of the incense may cover the mercy seat…

 

Heb 6:19,20  …which entereth into that within the veil; Whither the forerunner is for us entered, even Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec.

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Lev 16:15,16  Then shall he kill the goat of the sin offering, that is for the people, and bring his blood within the veil, and do with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat: And he shall make an atonement for the holy place, because of the uncleanness of the children of Israel, and because of their transgressions in all their sins…

Heb 9: 13,14,23,24  For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? … It was therefore necessary that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified with these… For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us:

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Lev 16:21,22  And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and shall send him away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness: And the goat shall bear upon him all their iniquities unto a land not inhabited: and he shall let go the goat in the wilderness.

 

 

Isa 53:6,11  …the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all…for he shall bear their iniquities.

 

Heb 9:28; 13:12,13   So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many… Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. 

 

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Lev 16:30  For on that day shall the priest make an atonement for you, to cleanse you, that ye may be clean from all your sins before the LORD.

Heb 10:10,12,14  By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. 

 

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Luke 24:44-48

And he said unto them, These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me. Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behooved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day: And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. And ye are witnesses of these things.

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The myth that Easter was a German goddess, or actually Ishtar in disguise, is so profusely integrated into the remembrance of what Jesus did on the cross and His resurrection, that I am hoping it would be helpful to show sources to refute this common error in thinking/teaching.

Historically, the German/Norse/Teutonic/Scandinavian evidence, from where the “story” of Easter allegedly originates – shows that Easter was never worshiped or celebrated as a goddess.  In fact, there is no such goddess recorded anywhere in historical records in either European or Scandinavian cultures.

The name “Easter” is taken from the Spring month of Eostremonath on the German calendar – also known as the Norse/Teutonic/Scandinavian calendar.  In other words, Eostremonath is simply, the name of the Spring month.  It eventually evolved into the English “Easter” as brought to England by the Saxons [ancient Germans].  Easter was used as a convenience and accepted, morphed/coined as the word to indicate the time of year when Christians celebrated the suffering, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ >>> because it occurred in the spring. 

According to historical records, spring was not celebrated festively.  That was reserved for summer and winter celebrations.  Neither was Easter evolved from Roman/Green pagan spring festivals.  Although that has been added to the myth as part of the council of Nicea in 325 AD or to Constantine, the word Easter was unheard of until the 8th century AD.  I have noted that some translations of the Council of Nicea include the word “Easter”, but I believe it was added much later [after Bede – 9th century] as a substitute word for pascha, which does not mean Easter, but passover, but to differentiate between the Jewish feast and the resurrection of Christ.

The beginning of the myth, as originated by the Venerable Bede, a Catholic monk, wrote the following:

 From De ratione temporum 15. [approx 700AD] (The reckoning of time, tr. Faith Wallis, Liverpool University Press 1988, pp.53-54)

15.  The English Months

In olden time the English people — for it did not seem fitting to me that I should speak of other people’s observance of the year and yet be silent about my own nation’s — calculated their months according to the course of the moon.  Hence, after the manner of the Greeks and the Romans (the months) take their name from the Moon, for the Moon is called mona and the month monath.

The first month, which the Latins call January, is Giuli; February is called Solmonath; March Hrethmonath; April, Eosturmonath; May, Thrimilchi; June, Litha; July, also Litha; August, Weodmonath; September, Halegmonath; October, Winterfilleth; November, Blodmonath; December, Giuli, the same name by which January is called. …

Nor is it irrelevant if we take the time to translate the names of the other months. … Hrethmonath is named for their goddess Hretha, to whom they sacrificed at this time.  Eosturmonath has a name which is now translated “Paschal month”, and which was once called after a goddess of theirs named Eostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated in that month.  Now they designate that Paschal season by her name, calling the joys of the new rite by the time-honoured name of the old observance.  Thrimilchi was so called because in that month the cattle were milked three times a day…

 

Reiterating, Bede had no historical information on which to base his supposition that Eostre was a goddess.  She cannot be found in any ancient writings or traditions in that entire part of the Norse/German world. 

A professor, Dr Elizabeth Freeman [BA (Hons), MA, PhD (University of Melbourne); Grad. Dip. Ed. (Sec), Grad. Cert.(Rel. Ed.) (Australian Catholic University)], teaches the history of Europe in the early Middle Ages (300-1000AD) and High Middle Ages (1000-1300AD). She also studies medieval Christianity, ancient nuns and monks. She has also written publically, that there was no such creature as a goddess name Eostre. From an article published in 2005 she concludes that the entire myth of Easter was made up – again, based on actual research:

Quote:

The goddess did not exist.

The earliest reference to goddess Ostara or Oestre is by a celebrated medieval intellectual — the monk known as the “venerable Bede”.

Working in north-east England in 730AD, Bede wrote a book about calculating time. Bede identified a pagan spring celebration called Eosturmonath. He said this celebration got its name from a pagan goddess called Oestre for whom they had a feast.

But when modern-day researchers scoured the history books they could find no prior reference to the goddess.

Researchers found many references to the spring celebration Eosturmonath but absolutely no mention of the goddess Bede reckoned the feast was named after. They suspect Bede fabricated the pagan goddess to suit his purposes.

“He has definitely made up that goddess,” Dr Freeman said. “Bede is the first one to mention it. German academics have found no evidence of the spring goddess Oestre anywhere else before Bede.”

Dr Freeman said Bede, who had been a monk since he was seven years old, was revered in an era where very few people were educated.

“Bede was extremely influential and his view has survived until the last 50 years when scholarship developed to the level it could show he was wrong,” she said.

Dr Freeman said Bede and his contemporaries constantly sought to find moral meaning for words and often made up definitions to suit their moral outlook.

http://www.religionnewsblog.com/10716/fur-flies-over-bunny-theory

From another source:

This was [Bede’s] attempted etymology of Easter – which is only called that in English of course. The problem is that as the Goddess in question, Eostre is completely unknown otherwise, … so  this proposed etymology is probably spurious. In the 19th century a German antiquarian invented Ostara, as the German form, using Bede as his source.

Bede admits this idea is his speculation – he is not actually aware of a goddess called Eostre, he just thinks there was one. There is not a single reference to her, from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, any of the other writings we have from the period, or from inscriptions. No depiction – no amulets – nothing. Her Germanic version was invented completely in the 19th century, and again has no evidence whatsoever from history or archaeology to back it up.”

http://jerome23.wordpress.com/2009/04/10/eostre-never-existed-why-easter-is-not-a-pagan-holiday/

 

Another one of the most mangled, twisted, and downright ugly views of Easter is this one:

“Semiramis, the queen of heaven, was “born again” as the goddess Easter (Ashtarte) as she emerged from a giant egg that landed in the Euphrates river at sunrise on the “sun” day after the vernal equinox. To proclaim her divine authority, she changed a bird into an egg laying rabbit. As the cult developed, the priests of Easter would impregnate young virgins on the altar of the goddess of fertility at sunrise on Easter Sunday. A year later the priests of Easter would sacrifice those three-month-old babies on the altar at the front of the Sanctuary and dye Easter eggs in the blood of the sacrificed infants. (Michael John Rood, The Mystery of Iniquity, Chapter 8) [see more on the heresies and false teachings of Michael Rood here:  http://www.seekgod.ca/roodbreakup.htm ]

 Everything about that twisted version is completely and categorically false and sensationalized to appeal to people who are convinced Easter is evil and wicked.  Ashtarte is not Easter.  There is no such thing as eggs being dyed in babies’ blood at any time or anywhere in history, nor is there any evidence that priest impregnate virgins on the altar of a fertility goddess at sunrise on “easter sunday”. These things are designed to get people in fear and to hate Christians who are celebrating and remembering was Jesus did for us.  To mangle and pervert the Gospel in such a way is just plain heinous, in this writer’s opinion.

Although there are many articles and etymologies that link Easter/Eostre/Ostara with Ishtar, historically there is no connection.  The Gemanic religious culture [Norse deities] never mentions Eostre or Ostara as a goddess at all.

 Digging into the Germanic/Norse/Teutonic history reveals that Germany was once a Scandinavian Country and therefore, embraced the Norse deities. The main female deities were known as Frigga and Freyja with no mention of Eostre/Ostara. 

 The Columbia Encyclopedia gives a brief overview of the Germanic/Teutonic/Norse religious system:

The Germanic Pantheon

Germanic religion, like most ancient religions, was polytheistic. In early times there were two groups of gods-the Aesir and the Vanir. However, after a war between the rival pantheons (which perhaps reflects a war between two rival tribes), the defeated Vanir were absorbed into the Aesir, and the gods of both were worshiped in a single pantheon. This pantheon, which according to some accounts consisted of 12 principal deities, had Woden (Odin) as its chief god. Other important deities were Tiw (Tyr), Thor (Donar), Balder, Frey, Freyja, and Frigg. The gods dwelled in Asgard, where each deity had his or her own particular abode. The most beautiful of the palaces was Valhalla; there Woden, attended by the Valkyries, gave banquets to the dead heroes. The ancient Nordic gods, however, unlike the gods of most religions, were not immortal. They continually renewed their youth by eating the apples of Idun, but they were doomed, like mortals, to eventual extinction.

The gods were opposed by the giants and demons, representing the destructive and irrational forces of the universe. It was prophesied that at Ragnarok, the doom of the gods, the forces of evil and darkness led by Loki and his brood of monsters, would attack the gods of Asgard. After a ferocious battle, in which most of the gods and giants would be destroyed, the universe would end in a blaze of fire. However, it was also prophesied that from the ashes of the old world a new cosmos would emerge and a new generation of gods and humans would dwell in harmony.

http://www.answers.com/topic/germanic-mythology#ixzz1AlyyV5QZ

Also from this source – no mention of Ostara/Eostre:

The four main deities in Germanic religion and Asatru are:

Odin (Germanic Woden) – god of magic, poetry, riches and the dead; ruler of Valhalla (gave his name to Wednesday)

Thor – sky god who wields a hammer, controls the weather, and protects the law and the community (gave his name to Thursday)

Freyr – fertility god represented with a phallic statue and seen as the founder of the Swedish royal dynasty

Freyja – fertility goddess of love and beauty, sister of Freyr, known by many names (including Frigg, Odin’s wife and patron of families, who gave her name to Friday)

http://www.religionfacts.com/a-z-religion-index/asatru.htm

“According to Norse Mythology – The Myths and Legends of the Nordic Gods by Arthur Cotterell, Freyja is the daughter of the sea god Njord and sister of Freyr. She is an important fertility goddess …”

“Freyja flew over the earth, sprinkling morning dew and summer sunlight behind her. She shook spring flowers from her golden hair and wept tears which turned to gold or to amber at sea.”

“For she [Freyja] was the goddess of lust as well as love, a suitable partner for Odin who was the father of battles.”

“The goddesses were clearly important in northern religion, yet only Frigg and Freyja play any main part in the tales ….”

“Freyja kept up the sacrificing, for she alone lived on after the gods.”

She [Freyja] was regarded as a giving goddess, bringing bounty to the fields, animals and mankind …”

http://www.valkyrietower.com/freyja.html

Some other sources about the Germanic gods and goddesses:

Idun, Ithunn – (Norse mythology) goddess of spring 

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Norse+mythology

Iduna/Idun/Iduun – Norse Goddess of eternal youth and spring

http://inanna.virtualave.net/slavic.html

“Idun, also spelled Idunn, or Iduna,  in Norse mythology, the goddess of spring or rejuvenation …”

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/282103/Idun

“In Norse* mythology, Idun (Iduna) was the goddess of spring and rebirth.”

http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Ho-Iv/Idun.html

Interestingly, the sources above that list numerous Norse gods and goddesses include zero reference to either Eostre or Ostara.

And here again – Eostre/Ostara is missing:

 “Norse Goddesses

Iðunn (Idun, Idunn, Iduna)

Frigg (Frigga)

Freyja (Freya)

Nanna”

http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Old_Norse_orthography#Goddesses

 Here are even more links here from historical sources that have written about the Norse /Gemanic/Teutonic religious systems, gods and goddesses, which show that Eostre/Ostara is not mentioned.

http://www.goddesses.com/index_files/AncientGoddesses.htm

http://www.enotes.com/topic/List_of_Germanic_deities_and_heroes

http://wuzzle.org/cave/lovegods.html

http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Ni-Pa/Norse-Mythology.html

http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/names/godsnorse.htm

 

It’s important to explore Bede’s writings which have come under intense scrutiny as we see in these references:

 

This was [Bede’s] attempted etymology of Easter – which is only called that in English of course. The problem is that as the Goddess in question, Eostre is completely unknown otherwise, … so  this proposed etymology is probably spurious. In the 19th century a German antiquarian invented Ostara, as the German form, using Bede as his source.

Bede admits this idea is his speculation – he is not actually aware of a goddess called Eostre, he just thinks there was one. There is not a single reference to her, from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, any of the other writings we have from the period, or from inscriptions. No depiction – no amulets – nothing. Her Germanic version was invented completely in the 19th century, and again has no evidence whatsoever from history or archaeology to back it up.”

http://jerome23.wordpress.com/2009/04/10/eostre-never-existed-why-easter-is-not-a-pagan-holiday/

See this article also:  http://www.celtic-catholic-church.org/oak_tree/easter.html

More info on Bede:

It is equally valid, however, to suggest that the Anglo-Saxon “Estor-monath”simply meant “the month of opening”, or the “month of beginning”, and that Bede mistakenly connected it with a goddess who either never existed at all, or was never associated with a particular season, but merely, like Eos and Aurora, with the Dawn itself.” [The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain; Ronald Hutton; p.180]

http://books.google.com/books?id=0WhvTFmRDCQC&printsec=frontcover&dq=stations+of+the+sun&source=bl&ots=im0AMtfwfD&sig=8-v3klcjmM1HOCB8fgMkvJ-sa50&hl=en&ei=Kr_yTKKeNcGblgfPks3VDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&sqi=2&ved=0CCsQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

“Eostre is a very obscure Goddess, and uniquely Anglo-Saxon Heathen. She is not mentioned at all in the Norse corpus and only fleetingly in the Old English by Bede in De Temporum Rationale.  Her material is so scant that some scholars have speculated she was not a Goddess at all, but that Eostre was merely a name for the holiday.”

http://www.englatheod.org/eostre.htm

“No Norwegian, Icelandic or other Scandinavian primary source mentions ‘Ostara’. In fact, the name ‘Ostara’ isn’t found anywhere in connection with a goddess. ‘Ostara’ is simply the Old High German name for the Christian Festival of Easter. Because the word is cognate with Anglo-Saxon ‘Eostre’, and because we have Bede’s evidence that Eostre was a goddess, Grimm concluded that “This Ostara, like the Anglo-Saxon Eastre, must in the heathen religion have denoted a higher being, whose worship was so firmly rooted, that the Christian teachers tolerated the name, and applied it to one of their own grandest anniversaries.” [Jacob Grimm, (trans. James Stallybrass) Teutonic Mythology, Dover Books, reprint of 1883 edition, volume one, p.291]

“All we know from Bede was that she was worshipped sometime in April. Bede also mentions another Anglo-Saxon goddess, Hredhe, who was honoured in March, and for whom the month of March was named. If the heathen Anglo-Saxons actually did worship a goddess at the Vernal Equinox, then according to the only historical evidence we have it would have been Hredhe, not Eostre.”

http://www.manygods.org.uk/articles/essays/Eostre.shtml

The connection of Easter with Ishtar was circulated mostly due to Alexander Hislop.  He has a rather lengthy section on Ishtar that is loaded with speculation.  This is how he begins his article: 

 

“Then look at Easter. What means the term Easter itself? It is not a Christian name. It bears its Chaldean origin on its very forehead. Easter is nothing else than Astarte, one of the titles of Beltis, the queen of heaven, whose name, as pronounced by the people Nineveh, was evidently identical with that now in common use in this country.”  [Aexander Hislop, TheTwo Babylons (1858) – Chapter III  Section II – Easter]

In that chapter, he connects Easter with Semiramis [completely false], and includes much conjecture and unsupported information about other goddesses, the definition of their names, and other non-historical opinion that he promotes as “truth”. 

 

Ralph Woodrow, who wrote “The Babylon Mystery Connection” based on Hislop’s “The Two Babylons” and at one time promoted Hislop’s “facts” became aware of the errors, wrote another book “The Babylon Connection?” refuting his original book and Hislop’s.  It took a lot of guts to admit he was wrong!  He makes this comment about Hislop on his website, admitting that most of Hislop’s connections and so-called “information” is neither historical nor accurate – it is sensationalism:

“Hislop, for example, taught that mythological persons like Adonis, Apollo, Bacchus, Cupid, Dagon, Hercules, Janus, Mars, Mithra, Moloch, Orion, Osiris, Pluto, Saturn, Vulcan, Zoraster, and many more, were all Nimrod! He then formed his own “history” of Nimrod! He did the same thing with Nimrod’s wife. So, according to his theory, Nimrod was a big, ugly, deformed black man. His wife, Semiramis—also known as Easter, he says—was a most beautiful white woman with blond hair and blue eyes, a backslider, inventor of soprano singing, the originator of priestly celibacy, the first to whom the unbloody mass was offered! This is not factual history—it is more in the category of tabloid sensationalism.”

http://www.ralphwoodrow.org/books/pages/babylon-mystery.html

In the Hebrew Roots Movement, Hislop’s “facts” were snapped up by CJ Koster [“Come Out of Her My People” – referring to “Babylon”] and by Lew White [Fossilized Customs] which promote the most unglody associations with Christianity and it’s “Babylonian/pagan/Greek roots” further hammering into and spreading the conjecture and opinions to unsuspecting people.  Many others within Hebrew Roots have promoted these writings and then propagated the myths within their own teachings.

Both Bede’s and Hislop’s errors are discussed here, and quoted with permission:

Alexander Hislop, in his book The Two Babylons [1858], mistakenly equated the goddess Eostre with the Babylonian-Assyrian fertility goddess Ishtar, and with the Phoenician fertility goddess Astarte. Questionable etymology and the mistaken research of Hislop has led some to conclude that the festival of Easter is pagan in its name and its origins.

However, the annual spring celebration of the resurrection of Jesus was not even called Easter until centuries after Christians began celebrating it, and etymological authorities (those who study word origins) have cast doubt on Bede’s accuracy.

In a footnote in a circa 1850 edition of Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History, the translator, Isaac Boyle, suggested that “our word, Easter, is of Saxon origin, and of precisely the same import with its German cognate Ostern. The latter is derived from the old Teutonic form of auferstehn, auferstehung, i.e. resurrection.”

The Evangelical Dictionary of Theology (Baker Books, 1984) article on Easter, after mentioning Bede’s account, says it is “more likely” that the word Easter “came from a German root for dawn or east (the time and place of the rising sun).” The Oxford English Dictionary relates Easter and the east to a common root meaning dawn or morning. If these are accurate, Easter did not derive from the name of a spring goddess Eastre. Rather, both words came from a root that means “dawn,” or “morning/rising/new light,” or by extension, “resurrection.”

More likely than Bede’s explanation, it seems possible that the resurrection celebration was named Easter because the word described the promise of new light and new life brought to humankind by the new-risen Son.”

http://www.gci.org/jesus/celebrating

Jakob Grimm — of Brothers Grimm fame (1785 – 1863), in his 1835 Deustche Mythologie; further promoted the Easter myth and wrote that Ostarâ,must in heathen religion have denoted a higher being, whose worship was so firmly rooted, that the Christian teachers tolerated the name, and applit to one of their own grandest anniversaries.” Again, scholars have noted his supposition, with no proof, based on what Bede surmised/made up.   Error begets error and is then promoted over and over again with hyper sensationalism in order to denigrate a title/word given to a Christian spring celebration of Jesus Christ. [see above quotes and footnotes

One other myth associated with Easter is that it is etymologically connected to estrus/oestrus giving it an even more sexual and derogatory meaning.  Easter has nothing to do with estrus as seen here in the etymology dictionary.  Please note that the word only goes back to the 1690s, and the definition of “frenzied passion” and “rut in animals” only goes back to the 1800s. Estrous > 1900. The word “Easter” is much older than that as seem in the various writings already sourced in this article.

estrus

1850, “frenzied passion,” from L. oestrus “frenzy, gadfly,” from Gk. oistros “gadfly, breeze, sting, mad impulse,” perhaps from a PIE *eis, forming words denoting passion (cf. Avestan aešma- “anger,” Lith. aistra “violent passion,” L. ira “anger”). First attested 1890 with specific meaning “rut in animals, heat.” Earliest use (1690s) was for “a gadfly.” Related: Estrous (1900).

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=estrus

Comparing Ostara/Eostre to Ishtar/Ashteroth/Semiramis/Astarte

The German Ostara does not come from nor is she related to Ishtar/Ashteroth/Astarte, etc.

Ishtar has a Semitic word root which may mean “to lead”.  Ostara is a German word that means dawn, rising sun and includes resurrection, which became the Anglo Saxton Eostre/Easter. 

    http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Ishtar

Ishtar is a goddess whose history goes way back to the beginning of civilizations and nations.  She is referred to in the OT as Ashteroth.  She is a Semitic goddess, not a Norse deity.  There is no connection between Ishtar/Astarte and Eostre/Ostara who was not even known until well into the Common Era.  Eostre/Ostara is not listed with the Norse deities of the Germanic/Teutonic culture.

Ishtar is a mother goddess, fertility goddess, the goddess of spring, a storm goddess, a warrior and a goddess of war, a goddess of the hunt, a goddess of love, goddess of marriage and childbirth, goddess of fate and a goddess who is the divine personification of the planet Venus.  She is also an underworld deity.  She is known predominately as the “mother goddess” and is connected to the earth’s fertility.

http://books.google.com/books?id=jEcpkWjYOZQC&pg=PA242&lpg=PA242&dq=ishtar+goddess+spring&source=bl&ots=OtCefQODD0&sig=k4CWOPv7hqFroGlkTUyx2jnsDvM&hl=en&ei=foDYTPjjE8OAlAeznZT9CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CCYQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=ishtar%20goddess%20spring&f=false

 

Here are lists of names that represent Ishtar in other languages and cultures and please note, not one of them refers to Ostata/Eostre – nor is there any reference to bunnies and eggs, or even sacrificing infants and using their blood to dye “Easter eggs”:

 Ishtar – Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, sex and the divine personification of the planet Venus

Ashteroth [found in OT] is the Phoenician/Semitic for Ishtar

Inanna = Sumerian for Ishtar

Astarte = Akkadian for Ishtar

Athtar  = Arabian for Ishtar

Tanith  = Northern African for Ishtar

Mylitta = Babylonian and Assyrian Mythology > The goddess of love and fertility and war; also called Ishtar; the counterpart of Ashtoreth and Astarte.

Ishtar (Istar) – Assyro-Babylonian; Akkadia, Chaldea, Semitic, Sidon, Sumner.

Also known as: Absusu (Sumerian), Abtagigi (She Who Sends Messages of Desire), Agasaya, Ashtart, Ashtoreth, Athar (Arabic), Aya (Babylonian), Banitu (possibly), Belti (Semite), Bisi-Bisi, The Bride, Dilbar (The War-provoking Evening Star), Gamlat (Babylonian), Gumshea, Hanata (Middle Eastern), Inanna (Sumerian), Innini, Irnini (possibly), Kilili (Queen of Harlots), Meni (possibly), Minu-anni, Minu-ullu, Nin-kar-zi-da, Nin-khar-sagga Nin-si-anna, Ninkarrak (Sumerian), Ninkasi, Ninlil (Phoenician), Sharis (possibly an ancient name used by the Armenians), Shaushka (Hittite), Shimti (Akkadian; goddess of fate), The Shrieker, Zanaru (Lady of the Islands), Zib (evening star who stimulates sexual desire).

Ishtar is identified with the Sumerian goddess Inanna and with Astarte of the Phoenicians and the Babylonians.  She has been identified with Ninlil.  Ishtar corresponds to the Chaldean goddess Nintu. Ishtar parallels the ancient Sumerian goddess Anunit in numerous ways. The Hebrew goddess Tamar is equivalent to Ishtar,  The Hittite goddess Shaushka is known as the Hurrian Ishtar.  As Hanata, she is also a warrior.  The Babylonian goddess Gamlat eventually assimilated into Ishtar, as did the Babylonian Aya.  The war goddess Agasya eventually became Ishtar as the sky warrior.  The vegetation goddess Gumshea merged with Ishtar. 

Her titles of Minu-anni and Minu-ullu may link her with the Assyrian god or goddess, Meni.  Compare Ishtar to Isis (Egyptian), and the Inca goddess, Mama Allpa. Ishtar is depicted sometimes naked, with her hands clasping her breasts.  Often she is bedecked in jewelry and has an elaborate hairstyle. She is also shown reclining, wearing a crowned crescent set with a shining stone on her head.  Sometimes she is shown holding her symbol, the eight pointed star.  In her battle stance, she carries a bow and is depicted standing on a chariot drawn by seven lions.  The lion, bull, and dragon are Ishtar’s emblems.  The lion is her sacred animal and perhaps the dove.

 

See also Abtagigi; Allat; Allatu; Anat; Anta; Anu; Arinna; Ashur; Astarte; Asushunamir; Atargatis; Athar; Aya; Belti; Boann (Celtic); Chemosh; Ea; Enki; Enkidu; Ereshkigal; Gilgamesh; Igigi; Inanna; Innini; Khumbaba; Kilili; Namtar; Ninkarrak; Ninkasi; Ninlil; Papsukaal; Ramman; Saltu; Sammuramat; Semiramis; Shamash; Sharis; Sin; Tammuz; Tiamat; Venus; Zerpanitum.

Information taken from:

http://books.google.com/books?id=jEcpkWjYOZQC&pg=PA242&lpg=PA242&dq=ishtar+goddess+spring&source=bl&ots=OtCefQODD0&sig=k4CWOPv7hqFroGlkTUyx2jnsDvM&hl=en&ei=foDYTPjjE8OAlAeznZT9CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CCYQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=ishtar%20goddess%20spring&f=false

 

The Relationship between Ishtar, Semiramis, and Tammuz:

Ishtar was the lover/husband of Tammuz

Dumuzi is the Babylonian Tammuz

Semiramis is the wife of Nimrod/Nimnus and the mother of Tammuz

More information on the Greek goddess Aprhodite and her connection to Ishtar:

“Astarte, Semitic goddess of fertility and love. Dominant in ancient Eastern religions, she was the most important goddess of the Phoenicians, corresponding to the Babylonian Ishtar and the Greek Aphrodite, also known as the Great Mother of the Gods.

Aphrodite, in Greek mythology, goddess of love, beauty, and fertility. She was either the daughter of Zeus and Dione, or she emerged from the sea foam. Married to Hephaestus, she loved and had children by other gods and mortals, e.g., Harmonia was fathered by Ares, and Aeneas was the son of Anchises. Aphrodite was awarded the apple of discord by Paris, leading to the Trojan War. Probably of Eastern origin, she was similar in attributes to the goddesses Astarte and Ishtar. The Romans identified her with Venus.

Some have even tried to connect Artemis to Ishtar, but in Greek mythology, she goddess of the hunt. She was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. Artemis is associated with chastity, marriage, children, wildlife, and, as a complement to the sun god Apollo, with the moon. The Romans identified her with Diana.”

Information from:

http://deoxy.org/gaia/goddess.htm

 

In conclusion, and reiterating:  Bede and Grimm are the only sources that connects Easter with a goddess named Eostre/Ostara – which has never been proven or authenticated – and by their own admissions and writings, supposed that she was an ancient German goddess.  The name “Easter” is a simple word “evolved” from the German “Eostre/Ostara”, into the Angle-Saxon culture taken from the names of the German spring months of Eostremonat and Ostaramanouth and traditionally applied to the Christian spring celebration of Jesus’ suffering, death and resurrection as the English, Easter.  In other words, there is no pagan connection. Easter was always a Christian celebration, it was never a pagan festival, because there is zero archaeological or ancient literary evidence to support that Easter was ever a goddess or that there were ever festivals in her honor [before the current wiccan/celtic movements] in either Germany or England/The UK/Ireland.

 

 

 

 

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The word Easter comes from the German, eostre which means “east”, having to do with the dawn or sunrise.  There is only one old source [Bede] that connects it with a goddess named Eostre [which appears to be exaggerated], but there is zero historical proof that she even existed.  The only possibility is an obscure and minute region of German folklore which is referred to by Bede with no records or references of any kind of worship or festivals in her honor from that time period.

Bede, c.700

Eostur-monath has a name which is now translated Paschal month, and which was once called after a goddess of theirs named Eostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated in that month. Now they designate that Paschal season by her name, calling the joys of the new rite by the time-honoured name of the old observance. [Christian monk Bede, De temporum ratione (“On the Reckoning of Time”), Ch. xv, “The English months”

This was [Bede’s] attempted etymology of Easter – which is  only called that in English of course. The problem is that as the Goddess in question, Eostre is completely unknown otherwise, … so  this proposed etymology is probably spurious. In the 19th century a German antiquarian invented Osatra, as the German form, using Bede as his source.

Bede admits this idea is his speculation – he is not actually aware of a goddess called Eostre, he just thinks there was one. There is not a single reference to her, from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, any of the other writings we have from the period, or from inscriptions. No depiction – no amulets – nothing. Her Germanic version was invented completely in the 19th century, and again has no evidence whatsoever from history or archaeology to back it up.” 1

It is equally valid, however, to suggest that the Anglo-Saxon “Estor-monath”simply meant “the month of opening”, or the “month of beginning”, and that Bede mistakenly connected it with a goddess who either never existed at all, or was never associated with a particular season, but merely, like Eos and Aurora, with the Dawn itself.” [Stations of the Sun, p.180]

“Eostre is a very obscure Goddess, and uniquely Anglo-Saxon Heathen. She is not mentioned at all in the Norse corpus and only fleetingly in the Old English by Bede in De Temporum Rationale.  Her material is so scant that some scholars have speculated she was not a Goddess at all, but that Eostre was merely a name for the holiday.” 2

“All we know from Bede was that she was worshipped sometime in April. Bede also mentions another Anglo-Saxon goddess, Hredhe, who was honoured in March, and for whom the month of March was named. If the heathen Anglo-Saxons actually did worship a goddess at the Vernal Equinox, then according to the only historical evidence we have it would have been Hredhe, not Eostre.” 3

Ostare is simply the German word for “Easter” ….

“No Norwegian, Icelandic or other Scandinavian primary source mentions ‘Ostara’. In fact, the name ‘Ostara’ isn’t found anywhere in connection with a goddess. ‘Ostara’ is simply the Old High German name for the Christian Festival of Easter.” 4

The “word” Eostre may have been borrowed from a pagan source, but the celebration of Easter is not pagan.  The concept of Easter in Christianity comes from the Jewish Passover as fulfilled by Christ, not because of the pagan festivals of the spring equinox.  If this were so, then Passover should also be connected to paganism because it is celebrated in the Spring as well.

Although Hebrew Roots has really tried foisting off Easter/Eostre as Ishtar, Asheroth,  [Greek goddesses from Greek mythology] or from Semiramis and Tammuz in the OT – they are unrelated to  Easter.   Easter is the English word that comes etymologically from the German Ostare.  Unfortunately, along with that, the myth about the egg laying “Easter rabbit” comes from the erroneous connection to Ashtarte/Ishtar [also known as Asheroth] and Semiramis, which are mistakenly assigned to “Easter” by the likes of Michael Rood.  This “teaching” has made the rounds through the Messianic Hebrew Roots movement as “truth”.  In fact, the way he presents these things is a sensationalized attempt to make Christians look like pagan worshiping heathens.

Michael Rood:

“Semiramis, the queen of heaven, was “born again” as the goddess Easter (Ashtarte) as she emerged from a giant egg that landed in the Euphrates river at sunrise on the “sun” day after the vernal equinox. To proclaim her divine authority, she changed a bird into an egg laying rabbit. As the cult developed, the priests of Easter would impregnate young virgins on the altar of the goddess of fertility at sunrise on Easter Sunday. A year later the priests of Easter would sacrifice those three-month-old babies on the altar at the front of the Sanctuary and dye Easter eggs in the blood of the sacrificed infants. (Michael John Rood, The Mystery of Iniquity, Chapter 8)

Bunnies/hares/rabbits were not originally associated with Eostre.  The Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore bluntly states:

“Nowadays, many writers claim that hares were sacred to the Anglo-Saxon [goddess] Eostre, but there is no shred of evidence for this.”

The association of rabbits with Easter began with the myths surrounding Eostre.  Because of the brief words of Bede, folklore and traditions were more than likely started about hares and eggs and their association with Eostre.  Bede’s comments about the legend of Eostre as a spring goddess [which historically cannot be proved] provided the “breeding ground” for a goddess who cavorted with hares [rabbits].  These legends began in the early 1600s in Germany and were eventually spread to England via the Saxons.

The Grimm Brothers took Bede’s short comments as “factual” and embellished them along with the legends of the day and wrote fairy tales about hares and eggs.  One of the stories is that Eostre found a bird half dead in the middle of winter and turned it into a furry hare to save its life.  Other stories morphed from that into an Easter bunny delivering eggs. 5

More German folklore says the Easter bunny and egg tradition came from the 17th century:

“The character of the “Easter bunny” first appeared in 16th-century German writings, which said that if well-behaved children built a nest out of their caps or bonnets, they would be rewarded with colored eggs. This legend became part of American folklore in the 18th century, when German immigrants settled in the eastern U.S.” 6

“The idea of an egg-laying bunny came to the United States in the 18th century. German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the “Osterhas,” sometimes spelled “Oschter Haws.” “Hase” means “hare”.  According to the legend, only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and bonnets before Easter. In 1835, Jakob Grimm wrote of long-standing similar myths in Germany itself. Noting many related landmarks and customs, Grimm suggested that these derived from legends of Ostara.

The German and Amish legends were most likely rooted in European folklore about hares’ eggs  which seems to have been a confusion between hares raising their young at ground level and the finding of plovers‘ nests nearby, abandoned by the adult birds to distract predators. Hares use a hollow called a form rather than a burrow. Lapwings nest on the same sort of ground, and their nests look very similar to hare forms. So in the Spring, eggs would be found in what looked like hare forms, giving rise to the belief that the hare laid eggs in the spring.” 7

The coloring or dying of Easter eggs is of unknown origin.  Some evidence goes back to the early Egyptians and Persians.  Christianity adopted the practice of dying the eggs red as a symbol of Christ’s blood shed on the cross.  Early Catholicism required that eggs be given up for lent fasting, so there were an abundance of eggs at Easter, which is a possible source for their popularity on Easter morning.

There is no historical source that shows worshipers of Ishtar took the blood of sacrificed babies and used their blood to dip eggs, although this information can be found on numerous websites – with no sources.  As Ishtar has nothing to do with Easter, it is obvious that the more sensational Hebrew Roots adherents punctuate Easter with bizarre pagan practices, the more they feel vindicated to demote and denigrate the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

The word pesach comes from the Aramaic/Chaldean word pasah – so it’s origin is “pagan”, which makes it as “pagan” as “Easter”.  The Greek paschal also comes from the Aramaic.

From the online etymological dictionary:

paschal

1427, “of or pertaining to Easter,” from L.L. paschalis, from pascha “Passover, Easter,” from Gk. pascha “Passover,” from Aramaic pasha “pass over,” corresponding to Heb. pesah, from pasah “to pass over” (see Passover). Pasche was an early M.E. term for “Easter” (see Easter).

In light of the etymology, it would be incorrect to say that Christians “mistranslated” the word pascha [particularly Acts 12:4]. History shows that pascha and Easter have been used interchangeably for centuries. 8 Easter is simply the English translation for pascha.  There is no conspiracy, no Greek paganism involved.  The celebration of the resurrection of Christ came to be known as Easter.

William Tyndale, in the 1500s coined the word Passover in his translation and used also used Easter fourteen times, which shows that the English word was in use in the middle ages.  Tyndale was an expert in German, so he knew the translation of Ostare to the English Easter. Some of the earlier translations also used Easter.  That the world and Christians have added other traditions to their festivities in no way lessens what Easter means to those who love Jesus Christ and worship Him, their risen Lord and Savior.

Judaism often uses the word Passover, which as noted, comes from a “pagan” translator, from a Hebrew Roots perspective.  The Jewish people have historically taken practices and words from other cultures and tongues and made them their own, with a new slant.  Like synagogue and affikomen – both Greek words connected to Greek/Hellenistic culture.

Of course Christians took pascha/Passover/Easter and refocused it on the fulfillment of Christ’s death and resurrection.  Christians are more than aware of Passover and the commands of God pertaining to it in the OT.  On the night that Jesus was betrayed, the disciples and Jesus were celebrating Passover, having killed the Passover and were eating the supper.  This is when Jesus pointed out that He was the bread and wine – the entrance of the New Covenant, bought in His blood.  He said: “This do in remembrance of Me” – referring to the breaking of bread and drinking of wine, which had replaced the feast of Passover.  It is clearly there in the Gospels.  It is not difficult to grasp.

Mat 26:26  And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body.

Mat 26:27  And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it;

Mat 26:28  For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.

****

Luk 22:15  And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer:

Luk 22:16  For I say unto you, I will not any more eat thereof, until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God.

Luk 22:17  And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves:

Luk 22:18  For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come.

Luk 22:19  And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.

Luk 22:20  Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.

******

Joh 6:48  I am that bread of life.

Joh 6:49  Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead.

Joh 6:50  This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.

Joh 6:51  I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.

Joh 6:53  Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you.

Joh 6:54  Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.

Joh 6:55  For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

Joh 6:56  He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.

Joh 6:57  As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me.

Joh 6:58  This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.

That night Jesus also washed the disciple’s feet.  Something that Hebrew Roots appears to leave out of their feasting.  Perhaps because it obviously conveys that Passover was completed and fulfilled in Christ, with the emphasis on serving.  It’s interesting that HR says nothing about this practice as part of the “Seder” – it was obviously left out.  Jesus actually said that we should serve others as He served us and gave His life for us.  Instead of moving forward in the grace and love of Christ, HR wants to go under the Law to keep feasts and totally forget what Jesus implemented.

Joh 13:4  He riseth from supper, and laid aside his garments; and took a towel, and girded himself.

Joh 13:5  After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded.

Joh 13:6  Then cometh he to Simon Peter: and Peter saith unto him, Lord, dost thou wash my feet?

Joh 13:7  Jesus answered and said unto him, What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter.

Joh 13:8  Peter saith unto him, Thou shalt never wash my feet. Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me.

Joh 13:9  Simon Peter saith unto him, Lord, not my feet only, but also my hands and my head.

Joh 13:10  Jesus saith to him, He that is washed needeth not save to wash his feet, but is clean every whit: and ye are clean, but not all.

Joh 13:11  For he knew who should betray him; therefore said he, Ye are not all clean.

Joh 13:12  So after he had washed their feet, and had taken his garments, and was set down again, he said unto them, Know ye what I have done to you?

Joh 13:13  Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am.

Joh 13:14  If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet.

Joh 13:15  For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you.

Joh 13:16  Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him.

Passover was given by God as a remembrance of when God delivered the children of Israel out of Egypt.  The original rendering is told in Exodus 12.  When God gave the commandments to Moses at Mt Sinai, seven feasts were also commanded to be kept by Israel during the year.  Passover was the first of these. Passover/Unleavened Bread was also one of the three required feasts for males to return to Jerusalem to keep.  We can see evidence of this is the NT when Mary and Jospeh took Jesus to Jerusalem to keep Passover when He was twelve years old.  The Passover seder was not implemented at this point in history – it is a much latter Rabbincial addition.

Passover also includes the Feast of Unleavened Bread.  Passover is a one day observance with Unleavened Bread for eight days.  By the time of the New Testament, Passover and Unleavened Bread were incorporated as one Feast.  We can see by the testimony of the Gospels that Unleavened Bread was actually the beginning of Passover and interestingly appears to occur inclusive of Passover, which begs the question of how did Jesus die at the exact moment that the lambs were sacrificed when they were eating the Passover [lamb] the night before Messianics are convinced that Jesus was actually crucified?

Mat 26:17  Now the first day of the feast of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover?

Mar 14:12  *And the first day of unleavened bread, when they killed the Passover*, his disciples said unto him, Where wilt thou that we go and prepare that thou mayest eat the passover?

Luk 22:1  Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover.

Luk 22:7  Then came the day of unleavened bread, when the passover must be killed.

It is obvious from the NT that Jesus fulfilled the Passover with His death.  Although some Messianics state that Jesus did not die as “sin offering” in remembrance of Passover.   Paul stated specifically that Jesus was the Passover Lamb!  If one looks at the Mosaic Law, it is clear that Passover also required a sin offering – once again proving that Jesus did in fact fully fulfill Passover.

Num 28:16  And in the fourteenth day of the first month is the passover of the LORD.

Num 28:17  And in the fifteenth day of this month is the feast: seven days shall unleavened bread be eaten.

Num 28:18  In the first day shall be an holy convocation; ye shall do no manner of servile work therein:

Num 28:19  But ye shall offer a sacrifice made by fire for a burnt offering unto the LORD; two young bullocks, and one ram, and seven lambs of the first year: they shall be unto you without blemish:

Num 28:20  And their meat offering shall be of flour mingled with oil: three tenth deals shall ye offer for a bullock, and two tenth deals for a ram;

Num 28:21  A several tenth deal shalt thou offer for every lamb, throughout the seven lambs:

Num 28:22  And one goat for a sin offering, to make an atonement for you.

Num 28:23  Ye shall offer these beside the burnt offering in the morning, which is for a continual burnt offering.

1Co 5:6  Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump?

1Co 5:7  Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: [the word Passover = Lamb]

Mar 14:12  *And the first day of unleavened bread, when they killed the Passover*, his disciples said unto him, Where wilt thou that we go and prepare that thou mayest eat the passover?

Luk 22:7  Then came the day of unleavened bread, when the passover must be killed.

Unleavened Bread is an integral part of Passover. The escape from sin and bondage is allegorical to Egypt throughout the Bible.

Deu 16:3  Thou shalt eat no leavened bread with it; seven days shalt thou eat unleavened bread therewith, even the bread of affliction; for thou camest forth out of the land of Egypt in haste: that thou mayest remember the day when thou camest forth out of the land of Egypt all the days of thy life.

Deu 16:4  And there shall be no leavened bread seen with thee in all thy coast seven days; neither shall there any thing of the flesh, which thou sacrificedst the first day at even, remain all night until the morning.

Exo 34:25  Thou shalt not offer the blood of my sacrifice with leaven; neither shall the sacrifice of the feast of the passover be left unto the morning.

1Co 5:6  Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump?

1Co 5:7  Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us:

1Co 5:8  Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

Luk 12:1  In the mean time, when there were gathered together an innumerable multitude of people, insomuch that they trode one upon another, he began to say unto his disciples first of all, Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy.

Gal 5:9  A little leaven leaveneth the whole lump.

The Passover Seder called the Haggadah, is the Talmudic interpretation of how Judaism keeps the feast of Passover. The Seder is a set of “late” instructions and traditions that have been fully incorporated into Judaism, that were Hellenistic in their origins.  The Seder was not yet practiced in the first century.  They have nothing to do with Jesus Christ, although Messianics and many Christians are convinced there are “hidden” meanings with the practices of the Seder that point to Christ, and that He observed the Seder at the Last Supper. The Talmud denies Christ, and therefore its decisions and instructions are not associated with Him.  How can a system that denies who He is give any insight as to His fulfillment through His death and resurrection by way of a feast that is perceived to be unfulfilled and ongoing – and has nothing to do with Him?

*** Stay tuned for Part 2 [The historical Hellenistic origins of the Passover Seder] and Part 3 [Why the Passover Seder is not allegorical of Jesus Christ].


http://jerome23.wordpress.com/2009/04/10/eostre-never-existed-why-easter-is-not-a-pagan-holiday/ and:

http://www.celtic-catholic-church.org/oak_tree/easter.html

http://www.englatheod.org/eostre.htm

3   http://www.manygods.org.uk/articles/essays/Eostre.shtml

4  ibid

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%92ostre

http://www.answers.com/topic/the-easter-bunny

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Easter_Bunny

7  ibid

http://www.easterau.com/

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Peter and the other apostles understood that Jew and Gentile were one under Christ and all are saved by God’s grace through faith, not by the law.

Every single person that claims to keep the law of Moses and advocates it must be kept fails. Because the very parameters within the law keep it from being kept without the temple, without the Levitical priesthood, and if even practicing Jews in Israel can keep less than 300, the dilemma becomes if one is required according to God in the law—to keep ALL of it– or face the curses for not and there is no verse anywhere in there to allow not keeping it ALL if one is bound to it—all those saying they keep it are lying–and breaking another commandment—so please before accusing, consider the implications.

Because Paul, Peter, Silas, Barnabas and other Jewish believers gave witness they could be with the Gentiles and not live as a Jew. Because Christ delivered the final sacrifice and removed the law out of the way so all people would have equal access based on the very basic reality that ALL have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. The law made no one righteous–and no one or no sacrifice or works can make us clean or acceptable to God, except through Christ, who can make us clean. Acts 15 tells that those Jewish believers who were commanding that new believers be circumcised and keep the law of Moses—-were subverting the souls of those they told, according to the apostle James and the other apostles and elders of the churches.

Act 15:24 Forasmuch as we have heard, that certain which went out from us have troubled you with words, subverting your souls, saying, Ye must be circumcised, and keep the law: to whom we gave no such commandment:

subverting means>

G384
ἀνασκευάζω
anaskeuazō
Thayer Definition:
1) to pack up baggage in order to carry it away to another place
1a) to move one’s furniture (when setting out for some other place)
2) of an enemy
2a) dismantling, plundering

3) of a place
3a) to overthrow, ravage destroy towns lands etc.
4) to turn away violently from a right state, to unsettle, subvert

Part of Speech: verb
A Related Word by Thayer’s/Strong’s Number: from G303 (in the sense of reversal) and a derivative of G4632

So to say those in Christ must be circumcised and keep the law is destroying their souls. That’s quite a burden to acquire and have on judgment day.

Peter said the Gentiles were no different than Jewish believers, and were made clean by faith in Christ, which is the true circumcision of the heart, not the body. He then asked why did any of them expect to put the yoke on Gentiles that the fathers couldn’t bear—and which they–the Jewish believers including the apostles– couldn’t bear. Notice that–it was meaning those from the time of Moses to then, and they as Jews were not able to bear that yoke; no one could keep it perfectly. So why expect Gentiles to?

Peter went so far as to say this concerning Jews and Gentiles, “… put no difference between us and them, purifying their hearts by faith. Now therefore why tempt ye God, to put a yoke upon the neck of the disciples…”

In other words, who did they think they were to challenge and try to change the message and Truth of the Gospel and the New Covenant, and try to burden new believers with the yoke that was taken away with Christ dying on the cross. And the truth that faith from Christ causes circumcision of the heart, and cleanses that which was unclean. For all. Jew and Gentile. There aren’t 2 different gospels and 2 different ways to live for Christ.

What was the yoke in question? What was being discussed? Circumcision and commanding the keeping of the law of Moses. That was the yoke the fathers nor they could bear.

The yoke was not something else as some try to say. Many Messianics and Hebrew Roots proponents like to say that the yoke was the “oral law”. But “fathers” in that text is defined as the fathers of Israel, meaning ancestors to those at Mt Sinai where the law was given to the children of Israel. The contrast of the burden of that yoke that Peter said the fathers nor they could bear, is found with Jesus saying,

Matthew 11:28-30 Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. 30. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

The yoke of the law was not on Abraham, but on Moses and the people of the covenant. Paul encouraged against being caught up in trying to keep the law of Moses by comparing it to being entangled with the “yoke of bondage.”

Galatians 5:1-4 Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage. 2. Behold, I Paul say unto you, that if ye be circumcised, Christ shall profit you nothing. 3. For I testify again to every man that is circumcised, that he is a debtor to do the whole law. 4. Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace.

People who advocate the keeping of the law of Moses, are trying to be justified by the law, which they can’t keep. Therefore, they are fallen from grace, according to the Scriptures. Anything believers do is to be for the glory of God and sharing the gospel. That is what the apostle Paul exemplified. Circumcision, as part of the discussed issues, did not come from the law of Moses, but was given to Abraham, after the promise was given to him by God and before he was circumcised. So that all those who walked by faith could be heirs of the promise. Circumcision became part of the continuing covenant with Abraham under the Mosaic law, but the promise had nothing to do with the law of Moses, other than to point to Christ and be a shadow of what was to come.

Act 13:38 Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins:
Act 13:39 And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.
Act 13:40 Beware therefore, lest that come upon you, which is spoken of in the prophets;
Act 13:41 Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, and perish: for I work a work in your days, a work which ye shall in no wise believe, though a man declare it unto you.

http://www.seekgod.ca/forum/showthread.php?tid=504

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What is Rosh Hashanah? Why is it considered the Jewish New Year yet falls on the Feast of Trumpets which is actually in the 10th month of the year, not the first of the year? Why do Messianics and those in Hebrew Roots observe this holiday when there is nothing in Scripture to support it? Why have Christians now embraced this holiday and prophetically promote Rosh Hashanah as when the Rapture will happen or others, who time the second return of Christ with the Feast of Trumpets?

In Judaism, Rosh Hashanah, which means “New Year” commemorates creation and is the imminent arrival of God’s judgment, in Judaism. On this day, it is said that God inspects the books of judgment for every person. It is advantageous, then, for Jews to repent of their sin, and excise sin as well before that day [the month prior, called Elul]. It is a time of reviewing the past year to see if they owe anyone money or favors, as well as returning borrowed items. The days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur [Day of Atonement] are considered the “Days of Awe” in which the things one does during that time will guarantee how the year will go for them in regard to the judgment of God. It is also the time that God decides who will live or die in the coming year.

As part of the Feast of Trumpets [Yom Teruah], tradition in Judaism has the blowing of trumpets in the synagogues, heralding the New Year.

I have provided several quotes from Jewish sites describing Rosh Hoshanah. I think it’s important to understand clearly exactly what Judaism believes and practices compared to what NT believers understand about the Scriptures. I do not see harmony between the two, but rather a lot of contradictions to the OT and especially the NT, which we know is fulfillment of the old covenant.

“The month of Elul is the final month in the Jewish year. This month is a particularly propitious time for prayer, self introspection, and repentance. It is a time of intense spiritual preparation for the coming year and the upcoming holiday of Rosh Hashanah. This year (2009/5770) the month of Elul begins on Friday August 21, 2009 and lasts through September 18, 2009.

Rosh Hashanah is the first and second days of the first Jewish month of Tishrei. It marks the beginning of the Jewish new year. The celebration of this holiday is marked with solemnity, as it is the day on which the whole world is judged for the coming year. Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world, as it was on this day that G-d created Man on the 6th day of creation. Every year, on this day, we proclaim G-d as our one and true King.”

http://www.torah.org/learning/yomtov/roshhashanah/

“In particular, the first festival of the year, Rosh Hashanah, seems to fit no familiar mold. It is the day on which we tremulously submit to the divine sovereignty and crown G-d as our king, but as the Chassidic masters point out, a coronation is always a festive event, with bands playing in the streets and crowds picnicking in the parks and fields. It is the day on which we stand in judgment before G-d, the day on which the Heavenly Court rules “who shall live and who shall die…who shall be impoverished and who shall be enriched… who shall fall and who shall rise”; but also the day on which we “eat lush foods and drink sweets… for the joy of the Eternal is your strength.” The Talmud offers the image of a person coming to court where a life-or-death verdict will be handed down on him, but he is dressed in white and has a feast awaiting him at home, confident that he will triumph in his trial.”

http://www.chabad.org/holidays/JewishNew…uction.htm

“Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, “head of the year” or “first of the year.” Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year … the Jewish New Year is a time to begin introspection, looking back at the mistakes of the past year and planning the changes to make in the new year. More on this concept at Days of Awe.

The name “Rosh Hashanah” is not used in the Bible to discuss this holiday. The Bible refers to the holiday as Yom Ha-Zikkaron (the day of remembrance) or Yom Teruah (the day of the sounding of the shofar). The holiday is instituted in Leviticus 23:24-25.”

http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday2.htm

“The ten days starting with Rosh Hashanah and ending with Yom Kippur are commonly known as the Days of Awe (Yamim Noraim) or the Days of Repentance. This is a time for serious introspection, a time to consider the sins of the previous year and repent before Yom Kippur.

One of the ongoing themes of the Days of Awe is the concept that G-d has “books” that he writes our names in, writing down who will live and who will die, who will have a good life and who will have a bad life, for the next year. These books are written in on Rosh Hashanah, but our actions during the Days of Awe can alter G-d’s decree. The actions that change the decree are “teshuvah, tefilah and tzedakah,” repentance, prayer, good deeds (usually, charity). These “books” are sealed on Yom Kippur. This concept of writing in books is the source of the common greeting during this time is “May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.”

Among the customs of this time, it is common to seek reconciliation with people you may have wronged during the course of the year. The Talmud maintains that Yom Kippur atones only for sins between man and G-d. To atone for sins against another person, you must first seek reconciliation with that person, righting the wrongs you committed against them if possible.”

http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday3.htm

“The beginning of the month of Elul marks the one month notice until the “Divine audit” on Rosh Hashana. Throughout the month of Elul, Jews search for every receipt and credit slip left by their behavior. “Did I belittle the secretary who couldn’t remember my name?” “Did I borrow $20 and forget to return it?” “Did I…?”
Elul is the time to look back over the past year, sort out our strengths and weaknesses, and see what impact our deeds have had. Like sorting the receipts, we can put our actions into little piles: wrong to G-d, our fellow humans or even ourselves, and good to G-d, our fellow humans or ourselves. Sometimes an action may fall into several categories. Reviewing our behavior is, according to the Medieval scholar Rabbi Moses ben Maimon (Maimonides), the beginning of the first step in teshuva, repentance. The Jewish view of repentance goes much farther than mere regret. Teshuva is a pro-active process that recognizes our fallibility and our ability to change.

On Rosh Hashana G-d holds each man and woman accountable for his or her actions over the last year … While people should strive to improve themselves throughout the year, as the month of Elul begins and the Shofar is sounded, we are reminded that there is just one month left. Thirty days remain to check one’s balance and settle old accounts. By using Elul to prepare, one is able to face the Divine audit on Rosh Hashana with clarity and confidence, knowing that one has moved towards his/her spiritual goal and has made a better connection with the power of the day, and with G-d.”

http://www.njop.org/html/Roshessay.html

Another good summary of Rosh Hashanah can be found here:

http://judaism.about.com/od/holidays/a/roshhashanah.htm

One of the Jewish traditions of Rosh Hashanah is Tashlich. This is the practice of bringing pieces of bread in one’s pockets and then going to a fast moving stream or river and casting the bread on the water. The bread represents sin being cast and swept away by the current.

For those who follow Christ, this practice is completely contradictory to salvation and the full remission of sins that we have in Christ. I am not sure why those who believe in Jesus Christ would do such a thing? Upon confession and repentance to God for sin, He forgives immediately. It is a simple, beautiful thing that we have the assurance of this forgiveness and do not need to spend days preparing and then casting our sins in free flowing water, represented by bread. God is the one who has cast our sins as far as the east is from the west, and as deep as the sea.

Psalm 103:10 He hath not dealt with us after our sins; nor rewarded us according to our iniquities.
Psa 103:11 For as the heaven is high above the earth, so great is his mercy toward them that fear him.
Psa 103:12 As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us.

Micah 7:18 Who is a God like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of his heritage? he retaineth not his anger for ever, because he delighteth in mercy.
Mic 7:19 He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.
Mic 7:20 Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob, and the mercy to Abraham, which thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old.

1 John 1:9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Clearly, observing Rosh Hashanah, which was developed by the sages/Rabbis of Judaism who do not accept Jesus Christ as the Messiah – and as Rosh Hashanah is Judaism’s tradition and practice, cannot have a place in the life of a believer. Rosh Hashanah denies the finished work of Christ and is a man-made system that has no merit in one’s relationship with the Lord.

There is not much information in the Bible on the Feast of The Feast of Trumpets. We do know that it required a sacrifice for sin and therefore; is fulfilled completely in Christ with further implications – as noted further down.

Here is the Scripture pertaining to it:

Lev 23:24 Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall be a solemn rest unto you, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.
Lev 23:25 Ye shall do no servile work; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto Jehovah.

Num 29:1 And in the seventh month, on the first day of the month, ye shall have a holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work: it is a day of blowing of trumpets unto you.
Num 29:2 And ye shall offer a burnt-offering for a sweet savor unto Jehovah: one young bullock, one ram, seven he-lambs a year old without blemish;
Num 29:3 and their meal-offering, fine flour mingled with oil, three tenth parts for the bullock, two tenth parts for the ram,
Num 29:4 and one tenth part for every lamb of the seven lambs;
Num 29:5 and one he-goat for a sin-offering, to make atonement for you;
Num 29:6 besides the burnt-offering of the new moon, and the meal-offering thereof, and the continual burnt-offering and the meal-offering thereof, and their drink-offerings, according unto their ordinance, for a sweet savor, an offering made by fire unto Jehovah.

For those who advocate, teach, and promote that Rosh Hashanah or the Feast of Trumpets will be fulfilled at a future date in either the rapture or the 2nd coming, I would ask how this can be? The Feast of Trumpets required the blowing of many trumpets. When Christ returns, He will descend with *one* trump and a shout, once – not for a rapture and then later at His second coming. I have heard some say in Hebrew Roots that they must “practice” the Lord’s return by blowing the trumpets. I cannot imagine anything quite so goofy or sacrilegious as that.

In the Hebrew, “teruah” is not the word trumpet – it is a signal, shout, or blast. It is implied in Lev 23 because the word “blow” is used as well.

Lev 23:24 Speak1696 unto413 the children1121 of Israel,3478 saying,559 In the seventh7637 month,2320 in the first259 day of the month,2320 shall ye have1961 a sabbath,7677 a memorial2146 of blowing of trumpets,8643 a holy6944 convocation.4744

H8643
תּרוּעה
terû‛âh
BDB Definition:
1) alarm, signal, sound of tempest, shout, shout or blast of war or alarm or joy
1a) alarm of war, war-cry, battle-cry
1b) blast (for march)
1c) shout of joy (with religious impulse)
1d) shout of joy (in general)

The word “trumpet” itself is not used in either text. The word “teruah” [H8643] is used 36 times in the OT and associated with trumpets about 9 times – that is only 25% of the usage. Here is the breakdown:

shout 11, shouting 8, alarm 6, sound 3, blowing 2, joy 2, miscellaneous 4 [sounded, sounding, shouted]

Another wonderful example of how “teruah” is used indicating shouting and joy is found in Ezra [each of the bolded underlined words are “teruah”].

Ezra 3:10 And when the builders laid the foundation of the temple of the LORD, they set the priests in their apparel with trumpets, and the Levites the sons of Asaph with cymbals, to praise the LORD, after the ordinance of David king of Israel.
Ezr 3:11 And they sang together by course in praising and giving thanks unto the LORD; because he is good, for his mercy endureth for ever toward Israel. And all the people shouted with a great shout, when they praised the LORD, because the foundation of the house of the LORD was laid.
Ezr 3:12 But many of the priests and Levites and chief of the fathers, who were ancient men, that had seen the first house, when the foundation of this house was laid before their eyes, wept with a loud voice; and many shouted aloud for joy:
Ezr 3:13 So that the people could not discern the noise of the shout of joy from the noise of the weeping of the people: for the people shouted with a loud shout, and the noise was heard afar off.

With that in mind, think about the birth of Christ. Gabriel announced His birth to Mary – a remarkable wondrous occasion in which a miracle was manifested in a virgin – she conceived Jesus by the power of the Holy Spirit fulfilling Isaiah 7:14 as well. AWESOME!

The angel of the Lord appeared to the shepherds with radiating glory all around, and a multitude of angels heralded His coming and sang for joy as it resounded in the Heavens. Amazing how that all fits together so well when you look at the meaning of “teruah”. This really indicates fulfillment in Christ’s coming as well as His sacrifice for sin.

Luke 2:8 And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.
Luk 2:9 And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.
Luk 2:10 And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.
Luk 2:11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

Luk 2:12 And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.
Luk 2:13 And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,
Luk 2:14 Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.


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Shavu’ot – Pentecost – FirstFruits – – Feast of Weeks – Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of Our Torah)


As Pentecost/Shavuot approaches, there seems to be some misunderstandings in both the Christian and Messianic venues as to exactly what Pentecost represents in the New Covenant. Most of the applications in cyber land come from Judaism’s traditions, with a Messianic twist. Neither of which are found in the Scriptures, but are interpretations from Rabbinical sources [also known as the “ancient sages]. These sources are not all that ancient, coming mostly from the middle ages and through the Talmud, which should not be a believer’s “handbook” for understanding. The Talmud denies Christ, it is not “for” Him, but against Him.

Below are some quotes referring to Shavuot – the first one from Judaism 101 which shows their traditional understanding and also explains the observation calculation.

“Shavu’ot, the Festival of Weeks, is the second of the three major festivals with both historical and agricultural significance (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). Agriculturally, it commemorates the time when the first fruits were harvested and brought to the Temple, and is known as Hag ha-Bikkurim (the Festival of the First Fruits). Historically, it celebrates the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, and is also known as Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of Our Torah).

The period from Passover to Shavu’ot is a time of great anticipation. We count each of the days from the second day of Passover to the day before Shavu’ot, 49 days or 7 full weeks, hence the name of the festival. See The Counting of the Omer. The counting reminds us of the important connection between Passover and Shavu’ot: Passover freed us physically from bondage, but the giving of the Torah on Shavu’ot redeemed us spiritually from our bondage to idolatry and immorality. Shavu’ot is also known as Pentecost, because it falls on the 50th day; however, Shavu’ot has no particular similarity to the Christian holiday of Pentecost, which occurs 50 days after their Spring holiday.

It is noteworthy that the holiday is called the time of the giving of the Torah, rather than the time of the receiving of the Torah. The sages point out that we are constantly in the process of receiving the Torah, that we receive it every day, but it was first given at this time. Thus it is the giving, not the receiving, that makes this holiday significant.”

http://www.jewfaq.org/holidayc.htm

From a Messianic website:

“Israel came to Mount Sinai on the third day of the third month (Exodus [Shemot] 19:1). The L-rd visited the people three days later (Exodus [Shemot] 19:10-17). Therefore, the Torah was given by G-d in the third month of the biblical religious calendar, which is the month of Sivan, on the sixth day of this month. This day is exactly 50 days from the crossing of the Red Sea.

Shavuot (Pentecost) is called the season of the giving of the Torah (Z’man Matan Toraseinu) in Hebrew because this is the literal day that G-d revealed Himself to the people of Israel as they stood at the base of Mount Sinai.”

http://www.hebroots.org/chap6.html

Another Messianic site:

Join us as we have an awesome night of praise and worship in a variety of formats. We will celebrate the giving of the Torah and the Spirit all night while praising our Messiah and the God of Israel!

http://www.messianicisrael.com/

After surfing through those Messianic websites, and many others – it occurred to me that all the celebrations of Shavuot [Pentecost] revolve around the giving of Torah and the other Rabbinic traditions: eating cheese and dairy foods and deserts, staying up all night, reading the book of Ruth, decorating with flowers, etc —– but include only a couple of lines about the NT Pentecost > the Holy Spirit empowering the disciples to speak in tongues and preach the Gospel. Then the sites and blogs revert back to the central theme of Torah, delving into studies and comparisons of how the original Shavuot was the giving of Torah. The underlying theme is the emphasis on keeping the Law of Moses [Torah] because of these comparisons and additions.

As I have stated many times in articles and posts, Torah is the primary focus of the Messianic venues, not Jesus Christ. It seems that every feast time abounds in all kinds of “revelations” that tie the believer into practicing the traditions and practices of Judaism, with the teeniest notations, if at all, to Jesus Christ. It’s as if the New Covenant is about Torah, instead of the Gospel.

Some even use Shavuot as the actual betrothal/marriage between Israel and God, comparing it to the Jewish Wedding Tradition [see this article: https://fortheloveoftruth.wordpress.com/j…d-rapture/ ]


The Biblical theme of Pentecost, as directed under the old covenant, is bringing the first fruits of one’s crops. This theme is what the NT interprets in regard to Christ, believers, and Pentecost [stay tuned for more on this Smile] . Other parts of the Feast of Shavuot included 2 loaves of bread; drink offerings; meat offerings of lambs, rams, goats, and bullocks that involved the covenant of salt – all the meat was sprinkled with it. Requirements for some of the crops were sacrificial offerings, and other crops designated for eating. The goat offering was the atonement for sin.

I have included the old testament passages regarding Pentecost here, and as you can see, there are no references to all the traditions and concepts that are attached to this festival:

Exodus 34:22 And you shall observe the feast of weeks, of the first fruits of wheat harvest, and the feast of ingathering at the year’s end.
Exo 34:23 Thrice in the year shall all your male children appear before the LORD God, the God of Israel.
Exo 34:24 For I will cast out the nations before you, and enlarge your borders: neither shall any man desire your land, when you shall go up to appear before the LORD your God thrice in the year.
Exo 34:25 You shall not offer the blood of my sacrifice with leaven; neither shall the sacrifice of the feast of the passover be left to the morning.
Exo 34:26 The first of the first fruits of your land you shall bring to the house of the LORD your God. You shall not seethe a kid in his mother’s milk.

Leviticus 2:12 As for the oblation of the first fruits, you shall offer them to the LORD: but they shall not be burnt on the altar for a sweet smell.
Lev 2:13 And every oblation of your meat offering shall you season with salt; neither shall you suffer the salt of the covenant of your God to be lacking from your meat offering: with all your offerings you shall offer salt.
Lev 2:14 And if you offer a meat offering of your first fruits to the LORD, you shall offer for the meat offering of your first fruits green ears of corn dried by the fire, even corn beaten out of full ears.
Lev 2:15 And you shall put oil on it, and lay frankincense thereon: it is a meat offering.
Lev 2:16 And the priest shall burn the memorial of it, part of the beaten corn thereof, and part of the oil thereof, with all the frankincense thereof: it is an offering made by fire to the LORD.

Leviticus 23:15 And you shall count to you from the morrow after the sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven sabbaths shall be complete:
Lev 23:16 Even to the morrow after the seventh sabbath shall you number fifty days; and you shall offer a new meat offering to the LORD.
Lev 23:17 You shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two tenth deals; they shall be of fine flour; they shall be baked with leaven; they are the first fruits to the LORD.
Lev 23:18 And you shall offer with the bread seven lambs without blemish of the first year, and one young bullock, and two rams: they shall be for a burnt offering to the LORD, with their meat offering, and their drink offerings, even an offering made by fire, of sweet smell to the LORD.
Lev 23:19 Then you shall sacrifice one kid of the goats for a sin offering, and two lambs of the first year for a sacrifice of peace offerings.
Lev 23:20 And the priest shall wave them with the bread of the first fruits for a wave offering before the LORD, with the two lambs: they shall be holy to the LORD for the priest.
Lev 23:21 And you shall proclaim on the selfsame day, that it may be an holy convocation to you: you shall do no servile work therein: it shall be a statute for ever in all your dwellings throughout your generations.
Lev 23:22 And when you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not make clean riddance of the corners of your field when you reap, neither shall you gather any gleaning of your harvest: you shall leave them to the poor, and to the stranger: I am the LORD your God.

Numbers 28:26 Also in the day of the first fruits, when you bring a new meat offering to the LORD, after your weeks be out, you shall have an holy convocation; you shall do no servile work:
Num 28:27 But you shall offer the burnt offering for a sweet smell to the LORD; two young bullocks, one ram, seven lambs of the first year;
Num 28:28 And their meat offering of flour mingled with oil, three tenth deals to one bullock, two tenth deals to one ram,
Num 28:29 A several tenth deal to one lamb, throughout the seven lambs;
Num 28:30 And one kid of the goats, to make an atonement for you.
Num 28:31 You shall offer them beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering, (they shall be to you without blemish) and their drink offerings.

*************************

It’s interesting to note that when Jesus Christ instructed and informed the disciples about what to expect after His ascension, He never gave any reference to the giving of Law. He spoke clearly – the disciples would be baptized with the Holy Spirit and endued with power from on high to preach the Gospel:

Acts 1:4 And, being assembled together with them, commanded them that they should not depart from Jerusalem, but wait for the promise of the Father, which, said he, you have heard of me.
Act 1:5 For John truly baptized with water; but you shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence.
Act 1:8 But you shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come on you: and you shall be witnesses to me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and to the uttermost part of the earth.
Act 1:9 And when he had spoken these things, while they beheld, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight.

The Holy Spirit endued the disciples on Pentecost with tongues like fire and a mighty rushing wind that filled the house where they were. Notice that the text states, Pentecost was FULLY come – fulfilled. It’s interesting that God chose that day – for Jerusalem was filled with Jews from all over come to celebrate the feast!

Acts 2:1 And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place.
Act 2:2 And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting.
Act 2:3 And there appeared to them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat on each of them.
Act 2:4 And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.
Act 2:5 And there were dwelling at Jerusalem Jews, devout men, out of every nation under heaven.
Act 2:6 Now when this was noised abroad, the multitude came together, and were confounded, because that every man heard them speak in his own language.

Looking further into Acts 2 during Peter’s profound preaching under the power of the Holy Spirit, the first thing he mentions is the fulfillment of Joel 2 to explain the tongues praising God, and then immediately begins to preach the Gospel, telling them of Jesus Christ. The hearts of the Jews were pricked when they heard that Jesus was crucified. They repented of their sins and were baptized. Still no mention of some kind of celebration of the giving of Torah, or instructions as to how to keep it from then on. Pentecost involved a sacrifice for sin. I am sure all there understood clearly what the feast required as they had come in obedience to the command. Now they were free from that! The Jews must have been awestruck at the news!

Acts 2:41 Then they that gladly received his word were baptized: and the same day there were added to them about three thousand souls.
Act 2:42 And they continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.
Act 2:43 And fear came on every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.
Act 2:44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;
Act 2:45 And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need.
Act 2:46 And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart,
Act 2:47 Praising God, and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved.


The New Testament shows us that Jesus Christ is the First Fruits:


Romans 11:16 For if the first fruit be holy, the lump is also holy: and if the root be holy, so are the branches

1 Corinthians 15:20 But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first fruits of them that slept.
1Co 15:21 For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead.
1Co 15:22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.
1Co 15:23 But every man in his own order: Christ the first fruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming.


What I find amazing are the number of verses in the New Testament that refer to fruit – the fruit that we must manifest through the Holy Spirit, which can be viewed as the first fruit of our sacrifices to God – proving that by His indwelt Spirit, by the fruit of the Spirit that we are His, sealed forever.

Mark 4:20 And these are they which are sown on good ground; such as hear the word, and receive it, and bring forth fruit, some thirty times, some sixty, and some an hundred.

Luke 3:8 Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and begin not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say to you, That God is able of these stones to raise up children to Abraham.

John 15:4 Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can you, except you abide in me.
Joh 15:5 I am the vine, you are the branches: He that stays in me, and I in him, the same brings forth much fruit: for without me you can do nothing.
Joh 15:8 Herein is my Father glorified, that you bear much fruit; so shall you be my disciples.

Romans 6:22 But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, you have your fruit to holiness, and the end everlasting life.

Romans 7:4 Why, my brothers, you also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that you should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit to God.

Romans 8:23 And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.

2 Corinthians 9:10 Now he that ministers seed to the sower both minister bread for your food, and multiply your seed sown, and increase the fruits of your righteousness;)

Galatians 5:22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith,
Gal 5:23 Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.
Gal 5:24 And they that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts.
Gal 5:25 If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.

Ephesians 5:9 (For the fruit of the Spirit is in all goodness and righteousness and truth;)

Philippians 1:11 Being filled with the fruits of righteousness, which are by Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.

Colossians 1:5 For the hope which is laid up for you in heaven, whereof you heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel;
Col 1:6 Which is come to you, as it is in all the world; and brings forth fruit, as it does also in you, since the day you heard of it, and knew the grace of God in truth:

Hebrews 12:11 Now no chastening for the present seems to be joyous, but grievous: nevertheless afterward it yields the peaceable fruit of righteousness to them which are exercised thereby.

Hebrews 13:15 By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name.

James 1:18 Of his own will begat he us with the word of truth, that we should be a kind of first fruits of his creatures.

James 3:17 But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.

Revelation 14:4 These are they which were not defiled with women; for they are virgins. These are they which follow the Lamb wherever he goes. These were redeemed from among men, being the first fruits to God and to the Lamb.

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